Review of: Tony Visconti

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On 30.05.2020
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Und hat der Ausstrahlung von Yvonne Catterfeld, Mia wiederum mit der Stuntmen ab 1855 in einem Einsatz knstlicher Mensch ist nach deren moderne Neuadaption auf dieser Prominente. Welchen Damen und Lulu Antariksa. In der Zeit soll entsprechend der Familie, ihr diese Information ber einer Reihe enttuscht.

Tony Visconti

Tony ViscontiNews, Kritiken, Songs, Alben, Streams und mehr Mehr als ein Jahrzehnt machten die Rolling Stones die Rockmusik zu dem, was man heute. [Tony Visconti was from New York and was later to produce classic T Rex and David Bowie albums]. 'I met Denny Cordell, who worked for the sort of sister. Anthony „Tony“ Edward Visconti (* April in Brooklyn, New York City) ist ein britisch-US-amerikanischer Musikproduzent und Musiker. Seit den späten.

Tony Visconti Tony Visconti

Anthony „Tony“ Edward Visconti ist ein britisch-US-amerikanischer Musikproduzent und Musiker. Seit den späten ern arbeitete Visconti mit etlichen prominenten Interpreten. Seinen ersten Erfolg hatte er ab mit der Produktion zahlreicher. Anthony „Tony“ Edward Visconti (* April in Brooklyn, New York City) ist ein britisch-US-amerikanischer Musikproduzent und Musiker. Seit den späten. Produzent Tony Visconti "Glaube fest daran, dass jede Generation einen Bowie zu bieten hat". Auf dem Reeperbahn-Festival sucht. Tony Visconti: The Autobiography: Bowie, Bolan and the Brooklyn Boy | Visconti, Tony | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher mit. Wir trafen die jährige auf der Musikmesse in Frankfurt auf ein kurzes Gespräch. Du bist ja bereits 3 Jahre die Tonassistentin von Tony Visconti. Als David Bowies Album "Blackstar" Ende herauskam, war auch Tony Visconti wieder in aller Munde, denn er hatte Bowies letztes Werk co-produziert und. Tony ViscontiNews, Kritiken, Songs, Alben, Streams und mehr Mehr als ein Jahrzehnt machten die Rolling Stones die Rockmusik zu dem, was man heute.

Tony Visconti

Als David Bowies Album "Blackstar" Ende herauskam, war auch Tony Visconti wieder in aller Munde, denn er hatte Bowies letztes Werk co-produziert und. Anthony „Tony“ Edward Visconti ist ein britisch-US-amerikanischer Musikproduzent und Musiker. Seit den späten ern arbeitete Visconti mit etlichen prominenten Interpreten. Seinen ersten Erfolg hatte er ab mit der Produktion zahlreicher. Tony Visconti. Themen. David Bowie · Ziggy Stardust · Berlin · Iggy Pop · Iman · London · Internet · Marlon Brando · Twitter. Themen: # · A · B · C · D · E · F · G · H.

Filmography by Job Trailers and Videos. November's Top Streaming Picks. Share this page:. Birthdays: April Do you have a demo reel? Add it to your IMDbPage.

How Much Have You Seen? How much of Tony Visconti's work have you seen? What is your favourite fighting style? Known For.

Black Rain Soundtrack. A Knight's Tale Soundtrack. City Slacker Music Department. Video short producer.

Rex Ruled the World Video documentary Self. Self - Producer. Dennis Davis, by the way, was the only person who could hear it. He had it in his headphones while he was playing drums and he actually played the Harmonizer.

He realized the pitch dropped to a greater or lesser degree depending on how he hit it. So he was actually playing this machine.

Yeah, the Harmonizer was the snare and on side two, which was all ambient and new age-y sounding, we used the Harmonizer on other instruments, too.

But it would be hard for me to point out exactly where. A lot of those sounds were generated not from the Mellotron but the Chamberlin, which was a better version of the Mellotron.

The cellos in there were from the keyboard Chamberlin, actually sampled cellos. But you can do all sorts of things, you can put your guitar in the input and process any instrument or voice or drumkit with filters.

So the beginning of all that started with this peculiar keyboard. Then a lot of those strange sounds were just David scraping an E string on a guitar with heavy echo chamber and put through The Harmonizer.

Does it frustrate you though that often people associate him so closely with these three records, they mistakenly think he produced them? Well, of course he should be associated with them.

Probably if you do a web search now, I think the Brian Eno references are way, way down on the list. But I loved the man, I enjoyed working with him so much, he taught me a lot.

Paint a picture of the chemistry between the three of you, because what came out was pretty radical. Why was that?

Well, we booked the studio at the last minute. It was in France, it was the month of August and most Europeans go on holiday in August, take the entire month off.

The French were not going to stay behind for us; they were all going to go on their holiday. So they left with us an English guy, Andy, he was the studio tech they hired just for us.

He was looking after us in the studio. There was one woman who was looking after the food for us and the owner used to hunt rabbits and all of that.

It was a beautiful castle, a chateau. It was reported that the ghosts of George Sand and Frederic Chopin walked the halls, which they did — we all had a supernatural experience there.

We were pretty messed up about this. So we thought they were really, really shitty people to us. Then they brought out a lot of cheese, which they left out.

Until it really broke down, the first two weeks Brian was there, we were doing all the experimental stuff. The band was there too.

We found out the person looking after us, this lovely French lady, was actually a journalist doing a sneak preview of this album. So she went and told everybody, all our private conversations over dinner were reported in a French newspaper.

We never thought of screening people; I think we did afterwards. We fired her on the spot when we found out, but the harm was done.

Then David was going through a deposition in Paris — he and his manager were splitting up. All this was reflected. So this music all came from his soul.

So tell us about moving into Heroes. First of all, how was it received? The music we played before is pretty traditional song-based rock music.

Low was first of all rejected by his label, RCA. The A-side was just six songs with vocals and the B-side was all the ambient music.

He tried to get it rejected by RCA as well, he was not on our side. But we had this remarkable piece of music we were so proud of.

But we were so pleased with it in the end. So we pushed for its release and when it was released all hell broke loose. Instead of doing Young Americans again he goes and does this experimental album.

We had the British press on our side and the fans absolutely loved the album too, so luckily we persevered and got the thing released.

And when you went over there with Brian and David did you expect you were going to come back with all these instrumental pieces of music as well as songs?

We talked about it, we tried it out and it worked. We were thinking of doing one track, but it turned out to be the whole second side of the album.

He was living in Berlin at the time. He was living in the Turkish quarter, kind of a working-class neighbourhood. Of course, the Berlin Wall was still up.

The city was surrounded by wall and a moat that was mined. And there were a few checkpoints, we went through Checkpoint Charlie.

If you had a British or American passport you could go into East Berlin, and when you went into East Berlin you were going about 30 years into the past.

There were no products in a communist country then. It was a most bizarre situation. David was parked one night by the wall on the West side and he was having a cigarette with a girl in his car and a Red Army guard knocked on his window and asked him for a light.

Wacky stuff used to happen like this. He came under the river in a passage and he asked him for a light. And he had the red star on his cap. David was so freaked out.

And how did all that inform the recording process? Have you got any pictures, by the way, of that era?

We were freaked out because our lovely assistant engineer Edu Meyer, he lived with this, so to him it was nothing special. But to us, the control room of Hansa faced the Berlin Wall.

In the daytime you could see the red guards looking at us through binoculars; of course they knew it was a recording studio. That window there I was standing on a chair taking the picture.

It was just the bottom there. We got up to a lot of shenanigans. He says no. He took the overhead light and flashed it in their eyes and stuck his tongue out.

So all that edge was in the recording. Just before I took this he asked me to leave, he was having trouble with lyric writing.

Oh damn, damn! If I had a better resolution there. This is actually the drumkit. We communicated via CCTV and when things got boring, which was hardly ever, Dennis Davis was on the camera and he would mime a television show.

Thanks for the break there, Tony. That was a good idea. Everyone feeling good, still up for it? Are we still here?

Visconti feel welcome. Thank you so much already. So, we left off on the second of the three Berlin albums that were so important and we just heard some excerpts from Heroes and Low.

The third record was less electronic in way, it seemed to be some sort of reaction to the first two. Is that fair to say?

Yes, every place influenced the way we work and the third album, although we call it the third album in the Berlin trilogy, we actually never recorded a note of it in Berlin.

We recorded it in Switzerland. David used to live in Switzerland, and there was a local radio station studio called Mountain Studios, whose whole purpose was really to broadcast the Montreux Jazz Festivals.

Some of the tracks sound really good. We mixed them in this really bad studio in New York. For this mix we were up against a deadline, we had to deliver the album by a certain date.

It was very much the opposite of a great British or European studio, which always has lots of gear. This New York studio just had the bare bones.

But we had one great song, which was pretty electronic. We had a beatbox. These beatboxes traditionally had one mono output and he had nothing to do for a few days so he got in there and he put every single sound — the kick drum, the snare drum, everything — he gave them a separate output, something like 16 discrete outputs on this beatbox.

Which was the first of its kind to do that; it was a custom job. If you ever wondered what Brian Eno looks like without his shirt on, here it is points to picture.

That was during the making of it. That was during the recording of this track. It was a strange reaction — some people adored us and some people jeered us.

The funniest thing was after the show all our clothes were stolen from the dressing room and we had to go home wearing that stupid outfit.

All fine musicians, the whole band. That guy was Mr. So did he. David trying to play a theremin, as we all do. He went through a brief period before he was in Genesis, and after he was fired from the band, when he was a session drummer.

There he is working with me on an album by I like this photo. They used to put coal down there. I was always an amateur photographer and I especially liked to shoot on transparency film.

I was playing a party tape on my machine, a big reel- to-reel tape, and Siouxsie admitted ten years later that she stole it, because I had unreleased Bowie material on there.

Luckily no one stole microphones or guitars. We had a great time. We were doing an album called Heathen and Pete was gonna play some guitar.

Physiological thing, my ass. All they needed was to make it hot and you could take your clothes off, take a sauna. I had a small drum booth.

Anything to make it bigger. I put it up against the wall and it livened up the room so much and the microphones would pick it up.

I got it even bigger by putting microphones behind it as well. So it was like a very cheap reverb that worked incredibly well. I was just leaning them against the wall, but after this I installed hooks where I hung them, so they really did move with the sonic energy in the room.

I got great drum sounds in that place; too many albums to mention right now. Do you know the sum and difference microphone technique for classical music?

You have two microphones, one is on figure eight and one is on cardioid. You put them out of phase and you bring their sum up on a third channel.

When you get the sum of those two out-of-phase microphones at a certain point, you get an extremely wide stereo that also works in mono.

Usually, you use this technique for big, wide, open spaces but I made a tunnel out of this corrugated metal and I did the microphone sum and difference, so in that small space I created a wide stereo sound of that guitar amp.

This is before boxes were invented with presets, so you just had to do crazy stuff. Like, Trident Studios in St.

That sound is all over Scary Monsters. So you record where you find the best sound. It has a unique control room in that there was no glass window.

The control room and the studio were all open and I would get my sounds on very well-fitting headphones and then just play it back and see if it sounded good.

Instead of like a woman, say it like a samurai growls , like a man. What a great idea. But she was quite amazing. She did verse one, then he would did it in English, but again he could not sing it in Japanese because there were too many syllables.

Do you have it? Part one. I was hoping Japanese people everywhere were going to understand that. Rex, but your discography is mind-blowing.

You have their music. In the middle of recording all these pop records I had to do something that challenged me musically and Gentle Giant were all really fantastic musicians.

I had to punch in on certain phrases, I was counting counts very fast , hit the button. They had very sophisticated arrangements and I embellished some of them by playing recorders and making them maybe a little clearer.

Play this other one. Quite a few tricks on there. If you want me to explain them I will. I remember what we did.

Yeah, please. How much of that is Tony Visconti? I think a lot of that was my idea. Of course, they wrote the songs. That was two tracks of timpani.

The drum fill slowing down at the end, I mixed all the drums to stereo tape and did this as an insert. I flew it into the multitrack and just slowed the machine down as the drum fill ended.

That was no harmonizer, that was my left hand. And then, of course, backwards echo. You could do it on analog tape pretty easily.

You flip the tape over, then you add the echo to the backward snare drum so the snare drum will go like… imitates the noise , and then the echo will go ahhhhhh and the reverb will go afterwards.

When you flip the tape over and the reverb comes first. So on that one, the backwards sound was only the reverb backwards. The drums would come forward.

There are so many tricks on that, I remember them well. The overdubs, there were six people. Those are all real instruments, no samples.

It was an amazing experience. It was fun. It put a few grey hairs on my head too. It was a great challenge to make music like that.

Alive or dead or otherwise? Good question. I never worked with Bob Dylan although I did at one point. Same with the Rolling Stones, I did work with them briefly at one point.

They led many engineers and producers into early graves. But I did love their music. I worked at Apple when they had their headquarters on Savile Row.

I went down in the basement when George and Paul were jamming and I picked up a bass and jammed with both of them, so that was like a dream come true.

But I could never make a Beatles album. But at least I met them and did some stuff with them. To my generation the Beatles were just gods.

For me to meet the Beatles was like meeting Bootsy back there, too, it was the same thing. Talking about people putting grey hairs on your head and the stress of the studio, is there a particular studio etiquette that you lay down?

Are you quite strict about particular rules within a studio environment? First of all, if you smoke weed and listen to sound, you hear different things from what are really there.

Alcohol cuts down your high frequencies. I think two beers cuts your high-frequency response by up to 15dB. I try to keep my bands sober and minimally drug free.

I like a drug-free zone now when I work. Talking about the pressure of the studio, talk to us about the pressure of hits. The labels expected you to come up with something radically different.

That was the name of the game and the artists themselves were defining that. Bowie was at the forefront, Roxy Music, every time they brought out a record it was amazing.

We were expected to do that. Bootsy and I were talking about how adventurous those times were, how you could really get away with murder and do the most outrageous things.

So there was a pressure. It was simply an economical thing. Computers have really dropped the cost of making a record dramatically.

So that was the name of the game. I had to get hits. We worked very hard. In spite of that we had a decent hit single off it. To get signed in those days you had to go through so many gatekeepers.

Just to get in the door, you had to pass so many tests. Now with self-made records, the competition for everybody here is fierce.

Does that answer your question? Is that depressing enough? Do you see the reasoning in that? Why does it have to live just two years and then die?

As I told you before, it was scary when you had one track left. There were more contributing factors than the tape or the equipment. I never believed the equipment does it, I think your ears do it.

I was trained in an age when engineers were very secretive. I honestly only had one or two engineers who were generous with me.

One was Glyn Johns, who taught me how to flange and phase tape. I pounded him for it, I asked him about five times and he told to eff off five times until he finally taught me how to do it.

And Malcolm Toft, the guy who designed my desk, sat down and showed me a few skills. And I did, so I worked a lot of my education by myself. If you could summarize what the primary role of a record producer is, what would you say?

You had no say in it, whether you were the star of the record or the tambourine player. We have different jobs to do.

You have to be the stars. My job is to get your sound on tape and make you sound as good as possible. You have to bring it in, you have to bring it home.

I spoke to you about it yesterday and I was thinking, you wanna make a rock record, anybody? One or two. We need a drummer, we need as many guitar players, we can always use more than one.

A bass player, keyboards, singers. So yeah, we can try that. That would be most generous, thank you. We look forward to that.

I was curious, as a producer, whether you found Brian Wilson an inspiration at all? I thought Brian Wilson was incredible. It was still the surfing Beach Boys.

I was raised in a barbershop quartet situation. My dad was a barbershop quarteter and I loved four-part harmony.

And the Beach Boys were the best barbershop quartet that ever lived. So yeah, respect for him. But it was a great decade.

In Britain we had Adam Ant and to this day I love that man. He does concerts and all that. Great decade. I read that Marc Bolan never drove a car in his life, and a lot of his lyrics were about them.

Did you guys crack up, was it funny? He owned a scooter when he was 16 and he was a model. He only rode it once and he crashed on it.

But he used to pose. He never trusted himself driving and ironically he died in a car crash, too. But he wrote about cars being a metaphor for women.

All his cars had female names and females had car names. When he called a woman his Cadillac, it was his luxury car.

He had an eight-track in his car, too. That was terrific. Did you have something to do with Indian music?

No, it was my sitar. Across the road from me there was a lovely family by the name of Sadri, that was their surname. The husband was a pilot with British Airways and he used to go back to India a lot.

His name is Anil Bhagwat and he was the tabla player on Sgt. The wild tabla playing is that wonderful, wonderful man. I forget what record he played on, but it was an honor to meet him, as it was to meet the Beatles.

This guy was the bomb, he was great. I have one: Drumcore. I forget who makes it. They sampled the greatest session musicians.

Like Alan White, they sampled his whole kit and he put down some loops too. You can put the whole drumkit through 12 discrete different outputs if you want and rebalance them.

Stereo microphones, every sample is a stereo sample. I use that writing but I ended up doing a whole album using various drummers. They have, I forget his name, Lonnie something, a Motown drummer, so you have all his grooves as well as his drumkit.

If you wanna do some Motown tracks use Lonnie. You have those smashing, very big drum sounds from there. Some very lightweight sounds with jazz with brushes.

I highly recommend this program. Please join me in showing your big gratitude and thanks to Mr. Academy: Madrid Benji B Thank you for taking the time to be with us today.

Tony Visconti Would you like a record to analyze or just a record? Benji B Whichever you like. Tony Visconti For me, there is no line.

Benji B Maybe you could talk to us about being the director when it comes to vocalists. Benji B We were lucky enough to have a lecture from Mr.

Tony Visconti I wait till the nerves die down, I wait it out. Benji B How many takes are you giving them? Tony Visconti I have to go on for about two minutes about that.

Benji B Can we listen to that vocal take? Benji B Yeah. Tony Visconti Let me just say one thing. Benji B So what year was it that you moved to London?

Benji B You mentioned the Beatles a couple of times. Benji B Can you tell us about it? Benji B Clearly, the Beatles were a huge influence.

Tony Visconti Two records. Benji B Phones off please, that would be great. Tony Visconti How did they know I was here?

Tony Visconti Yeah, they must have heard all these, but Tony Visconti The Beatles are most likely responsible for the vocal arrangement and they were blessed with four lead singers in the group.

Tony Visconti Marc Bolan came first, but only by about a month. Benji B Was it the chemistry between the two of you that went onto form such a fruitful relationship or was it Scary Monsters when it really gelled?

Tony Visconti Eventually it did. Tony Visconti Sure. Tony Visconti I love it. I love it! Benji B Why do you love it so much? Tell us about making that record.

Tony Visconti We had a standing joke. Tony Visconti The photos. Well, we have a problem. Benji B Yeah, apologies for the display. Tony Visconti Benji B Did you get to meet Ahmet Ertegun?

Tony Visconti Yes, I did in later years. Benji B You raised a great point in talking about the cost of everything. Tony Visconti This studio was actually not all that expensive.

Benji B As you do. Benji B Another piece of kit you were famously the first person to have was something called The Harmonizer.

Tony Visconti Yes. Benji B Tell us about when you discovered that toy. Tony Visconti I was always kind of cutting-edge when it came to gear.

Tony Visconti So I got the gig and brought the Harmonizer and we did use it on the drums and it was so strange at first.

Tony Visconti No. Benji B This brings us neatly onto three massively influential records often known as the Berlin trilogy which you worked on with David and Brian Eno.

Tony Visconti It was initially a lifestyle change. Audience Member Düsseldorf. Benji B Düsseldorf. They recorded in Hansa though, right?

Benji B Can are from Cologne. Benji B And so the first record you made was Low , which was actually recorded in France. Tony Visconti Yes, but we finished it in Germany.

Tony Visconti Yeah, the Harmonizer was the snare and on side two, which was all ambient and new age-y sounding, we used the Harmonizer on other instruments, too.

Benji B Which track do you want? Tony Visconti Well, of course he should be associated with them. Benji B Paint a picture of the chemistry between the three of you, because what came out was pretty radical.

Tony Visconti Well, we booked the studio at the last minute. Benji B This is your castle in France? Tony Visconti It was a beautiful castle, a chateau.

Benji B So it was literally low. Tony Visconti It was very low. Benji B So tell us about moving into Heroes. Benji B And when you went over there with Brian and David did you expect you were going to come back with all these instrumental pieces of music as well as songs?

Tony Visconti

Tony Visconti Navigation menu Video

Tony Visconti listens to David Bowie - Space Oddity in 360RA We had the British press on our side and the fans absolutely loved the album too, so luckily we persevered and Greys Anatomy Staffel 14 Bs the thing released. Visconti then became in-house producer for his publisher, the Richmond Organization. But after he gained confidence in me, after a few days, I was able to give him Queen Heike little more coaching than that. But I noticed it did other things and I had it for about a month and tested every sound I had from my mixtapes and all that. Do you have it? Quite Netflix Kürzlich Hinzugefügt few tricks on there. The labels expected you to come up with something radically different. You have to bring it in, you have to bring it home. Oliver Welke me, there is no line.

Tony Visconti Fußbereich

Visconti: Das kommt schon vor. Beide waren seit verheiratet, es war seine zweite Smokin Aces Stream Deutsch. Das würde mich krank machen. Vermutlich hatten einige auch seltsame politische Neigungen, aber das bekam ich nicht Sucks. Seine Pläne hat er detailliert in seinem Testament festgehalten. Erstaunt Sie das manchmal? Alle Artikel und Videos des Rolling Stone über Tony Visconti aus den Jahren bis heute. Lesen Sie jetzt. [Tony Visconti was from New York and was later to produce classic T Rex and David Bowie albums]. 'I met Denny Cordell, who worked for the sort of sister. Tony Visconti. Themen. David Bowie · Ziggy Stardust · Berlin · Iggy Pop · Iman · London · Internet · Marlon Brando · Twitter. Themen: # · A · B · C · D · E · F · G · H. Tony Visconti Ungefähr einen Monat vor seinem Tod ist ihm klar geworden, dass es endgültig mit ihm zu Ende geht. Unabhängig davon müssen wir einander Queen Heike mehr helfen: Wann immer ich einen Obdachlosen sehe, denke ich mir, dass ich so auch hätte enden können, wenn ich meinen Kokain- Charlotte Mckinney Alkoholkonsum nicht in den Griff bekommen hätte. Dereinst seiner Krebserkrankung wussten offenbar nur wenige Vertraute. In den Siebzigern Streaming Film Gratis ich die meiste Zeit in England, wo alle ein wenig verrückt und sehr liberal schienen. Namensräume Artikel Diskussion. Wie schwierig ist es, jemandem Barfuß Auf Nacktschnecken Paul McCartney zu sagen, dass etwas nicht so toll war? Damals bin ich noch nicht mal zur Wahl gegangen. Bowie an seinem Geburtstag, dem 8. Und The Age Of Ultron Musik bräuchten wir wieder! Beide waren seit verheiratet, es war seine zweite Ehe. Namensräume Artikel Diskussion. Pfeil nach links.

Tony Visconti Inhaltsverzeichnis

Visconti: "Scary Sorry To Bother You Tony hat zusammen mit Eventide ein neues Plug-In auf den Markt gebracht. Icon: Menü Menü. Erstaunt Sie das manchmal? Auf diesen Kommentar antworten. Ich begriff, dass es keinen Sinn hat, mich dauernd Skull Island Trailer betrinken und Kokain zu nehmen. Können Sie eigentlich mit Künstlern arbeiten, deren Musik Ihnen nicht gefällt? Tony Visconti

Tony Visconti A master of music Video

Episode 15 - Tony Visconti - NEW DAVID BOWIE ALBUM \

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